You are Welcome to Attend all 7+ Keynote Speeches* Shared by Co-Located
IEEE PRDC 2015/ICA3PP 2015 Conferences as below:

Keynote Speaker 1: Dr. John C.S. Lui, Fellow of ACM, Fellow of IEEE
Professor at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Title: The Shapley Value: Its Use and Implications on Internet Economics


Keynote Speaker 2: Dr. Sy-Yen Kuo, Fellow of IEEE
Dean and Professor at Taiwan University, Taiwan
TitleSelected Threats and Challenges for Dependable Systems


Keynote Speaker 3: Dr. Jiannong Cao, Fellow of IEEE
Head and Professor at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
TitleDesign of Distributed Algorithms for Engineering Applications of WSNs


Keynote Speaker 4: Dr. Kazuhiko Iwasaki
Professor at Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
TitleImprovement of Shipped Product Quality Level for Logic VLSIs Based on Semiconductor Chip Layout


Keynote Speaker 5: Dr. Wanlei Zhou, Senior Member of IEEE
Alfred Deakin Professor, Chair of Information Technology at Deakin University, Australia
TitleIdentifying Propagation Sources and Modeling Propagation Dynamics in Networks


Keynote Speaker 6: Dr. Hai Jin, Senior Member of IEEE
Dean and Professor at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China
TitleIn-Memory Computing: New Architecture for Big Data Processing


Keynote Speaker 7: Dr. Sean He, Senior Member of IEEE
Professor at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Australia
TitleDetection of Denial-of-Service Attacks Based on Computer Vision Techniques


Detailed Information about Keynote Speeches


Keynote Speaker 1: Dr. John C.S. Lui, Fellow of ACM, Fellow of IEEE
Professor at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Title: The Shapley Value: Its Use and Implications on Internet Economics

Abstract: Within the current Internet, autonomous ISPs implement bilateral agreements, with each ISP establishing agreements that suit its own local objective to maximize its profit. Peering agreements based on local views and bilateral settlements, while expedient, encourage selfish routing strategies and discriminatory interconnections. From a more global perspective, such settlements reduce aggregate profits, limit the stability of routes, and discourage potentially useful peering/connectivity arrangements, thereby unnecessarily balkanizing the Internet. We show that if the distribution of profits is enforced at a global level, then there exist profit-sharing mechanisms derived from the coalition games concept of Shapley value and its extensions that will encourage these selfish ISPs who seek to maximize their own profits to converge to a Nash equilibrium. We show that these profit sharing schemes exhibit several fairness properties that support the argument that this distribution of profits is desirable. In addition, at the Nash equilibrium point, the routing and connecting/peering strategies maximize aggregate network profits, encourage ISP connectivity so as to limit balkanization.

Prof. John C.S. Lui is currently the Choh-Ming Li Chair Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.  He is a fellow of ACM, fellow of IEEE and the senior research fellow of the Croucher Foundation.  His research interests are in network science, Internet, network/system security, network economics and performance evaluation theory.

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Keynote Speaker 2: Dr. Sy-Yen Kuo, Fellow of IEEE
Dean and Professor at Taiwan University, Taiwan
Title:  Selected Threats and Challenges for Dependable Systems

Abstract:  With the advent of Internet of Things (IoT) technology, the networked devices pervade every aspect of our daily life. Therefore, we are facing more serious threats to the dependability of systems and information due to problems caused by accidental events such as human mistakes and physical malfunctions or by intentional behavior being either malicious or non-malicious. In this talk, we will discuss some example threats and challenges for systems requiring high dependability. We then give views of future directions in research on the dependability of networked systems.

Sy-Yen Kuo is a Distinguished Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University (NTU), Taipei, Taiwan. He was the Dean of College of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in NTU from 2012 to 2015 and the Chairman of Department of Electrical Engineering in NTU from 2001 to 2004. He also took a leave from NTU and served as a Chair Professor and Dean of the College of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology from 2006 to 2009. He received the BS (1979) in Electrical Engineering from National Taiwan University, the MS (1982) in Electrical & Computer Engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the PhD (1987) in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He spent his sabbatical years as a Visiting Professor at Hong Kong Polytechnic University from 2011-2012 and at the Chinese University of Hong Kong from 2004-2005, and as a visiting researcher at AT&T Labs-Research, New Jersey from 1999 to 2000, respectively. He was a faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona from 1988 to 1991, and an engineer at Fairchild Semiconductor and Silvar-Lisco, both in California, from 1982 to 1984. In 1989, he also worked as a summer faculty fellow at Jet Propulsion Laboratory of California Institute of Technology. His current research interests include dependable systems and networks, mobile computing, cloud computing, and quantum computing and communications. 
Professor Kuo is an IEEE Fellow. He has published more than 400 papers in journals and conferences, and also holds 18 US patents, 12 Taiwan patents, and several patents other countries. He received the Distinguished Research Award and the Distinguished Research Fellow award from the National Science Council, Taiwan. He was also a recipient of the Best Paper Award in the 1996 International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering, the Best Paper Award in the simulation and test category at the 1986 IEEE/ACM Design Automation Conference (DAC), the National Science Foundation's Research Initiation Award in 1989, and the IEEE/ACM Design Automation Scholarship in 1990 and 1991.

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Keynote Speaker 3: Dr. Jiannong Cao, Fellow of IEEE
Head and Professor at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Title: Design of Distributed Algorithms for Engineering Applications of WSNs

Abstract: As technology advances, applications of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have been extended from traditional habitat monitoring, air pollution monitoring, etc., to more domain-specific engineering areas such as structural health monitoring (SHM) and volcano tomography. However, how to implement the sophisticated models and algorithms of these engineering applications within a resource-limited WSN becomes the main roadblock. This task is difficult because these algorithms are not only computationally intensive, but also involve data-level collaboration of multiple sensors. Data-level collaboration refers to that data collected from different sensors are tightly coupled in the computation process.In this presentation, using some typical engineering applications such as SHM, smart grid and volcanic tomography, I will discuss the issues and techniques of designing distributed, light-weight version of these engineering computation algorithms. The distributed algorithms should be able to optimize some pre-defined performance criteria (e.g. communication cost and time-to-completion) under severe resource constraints and various uncertainties in the system. I will describe frameworks for decomposing some typical sophisticated and centralized signal processing algorithms and computation tasks within a large scale WSN with guaranteed accuracy and optimized performance. Research in this direction will provide the foundation for extending the capability of WSNs to more engineering application domains.

Dr. Cao is currently a chair professor and head of the Department of Computing at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong. His research interests include parallel and distributed computing, computer networks, mobile and pervasive computing, fault tolerance, and middleware. He has co-authored 3 books, co-edited 9 books, and published over 300 papers in major international journals and conference proceedings. He is a fellow of IEEE, a senior member of China Computer Federation, and a member of ACM. He was the Chair of the Technical Committee on Distributed Computing of IEEE Computer Society from 2012 - 2014. Dr. Cao has served as an associate editor and a member of the editorial boards of many international journals, including ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks, IEEE Transactions on Computers, IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, IEEE Networks, Pervasive and Mobile Computing Journal, and Peer-to-Peer Networking and Applications. He has also served as a chair and member of organizing / program committees for many international conferences, including PERCOM, INFOCOM, ICDCS, IPDPS, ICPP, RTSS, DSN, ICNP, SRDS, MASS, PRDC, ICC, GLOBECOM, and WCNC. Dr. Cao received the BSc degree in computer science from Nanjing University, Nanjing, China, and the MSc and the Ph.D degrees in computer science from Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.

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Keynote Speaker 4: Dr. Kazuhiko Iwasaki
Professor at Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
Title: Improvement of Shipped Product Quality Level for Logic VLSIs Based on Semiconductor Chip Layout

Abstract: TBD

Kazuhiko Iwasaki received B.E. degree in 1977, M.E. Degree in 1979, and Ph. D. degree in 1988, all in information and computer sciences from Osaka University. He joined Hitachi’s Central Research Laboratory in 1979. From 1990 to 1995 he was an associate professor at Chiba University. Presently, he is a professor of Tokyo Metropolitan University. His research interests include VLSI tesing and dependable networking. He is a fellow of the IEICE, a senior member of the IEEE, and a member of the IPSJ.

 

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Keynote Speaker 5: Dr. Wanlei Zhou, Senior Member of IEEE
Alfred Deakin Professor, Chair of Information Technology at Deakin University, Australia
Title: Identifying Propagation Sources and Modeling Propagation Dynamics in Networks

Abstract: It has long been a significant but difficult problem to identify propagation sources and model propagation dynamics based on limited knowledge of network structures and the varying states of network nodes. Real cases of identifying propagation sources and modeling propagation dynamics include finding the spreader of malware and propagation process in computer networks, and locating the sources of rumours and propagation dynamics of rumours and truths in online social networks. This talk reviews the state-of-the art in source identification techniques, and discusses the pros and cons of current methods in this field. In order to gain a quantitative understanding of current methods, we provide a series of experiments and comparisons based on various environment settings. We then present our work in modelling the propagation of scanning worms, online social network worms, as well as rumours and truths in online social networks.

Professor Wanlei Zhou received the B.Eng and M.Eng degrees from Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China in 1982 and 1984, respectively, and the PhD degree from The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, in 1991, all in Computer Science and Engineering. He also received a DSc degree (a higher Doctorate degree) from Deakin University in 2002. He is currently the Alfred Deakin Professor (the highest honour the University can bestow on a member of academic staff) and Chair Professor in Information Technology, School of Information Technology, Deakin University. Professor Zhou has been the Head of School of Information Technology twice (Jan 2002-Apr 2006 and Jan 2009-Jan 2015) and Associate Dean of Faculty of Science and Technology in Deakin University (May 2006-Dec 2008). Before joining Deakin University, Professor Zhou served as a lecturer in University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, a system programmer in HP at Massachusetts, USA; a lecturer in Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; and a lecturer in National University of Singapore, Singapore. His research interests include distributed systems, network security, bioinformatics, and e-learning. Professor Zhou has published more than 300 papers in refereed international journals and refereed international conferences proceedings. He has also chaired many international conferences. Prof Zhou is a Senior Member of the IEEE.

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Keynote Speaker 6: Dr. Hai Jin, Senior Member of IEEE
Dean and Professor at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China
Title: In-Memory Computing: New Architecture for Big Data Processing

Abstract: With emerging of big data, the processing speed for the data is one of the key issues for big data technology. One of the efficient way to handle the velocity of data is putting all the data in the memory. But traditional memory, DRAM, consumes a large amount of energy and cost to build a large memory system. In recent years, lots of non-volatile memory devices, such as phase change memory (PCM), are studied to be part of memory. We call these storage class memory (SCM). Combing traditional memory and SCM together to build a large hybrid memory space is becoming one of the energy-efficient way to extend the traditional in-memory computing system into a new level, to handle large quality of data in real time. In this talk, we will discuss this new in-memory computing system from different aspects and some challenges in this new system. We will also report some ongoing effort in China to build this hybrid memory-based in-memory computing system, and some latest advances in this area.

Hai Jin is a Cheung Kung Scholars Chair Professor of computer science and engineering at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST) in China. Jin received his PhD in computer engineering from HUST in 1994. In 1996, he was awarded a German Academic Exchange Service fellowship to visit the Technical University of Chemnitz in Germany. Jin worked at The University of Hong Kong between 1998 and 2000, and as a visiting scholar at the University of Southern California between 1999 and 2000. He was awarded Excellent Youth Award from the National Science Foundation of China in 2001. Jin is the chief scientist of ChinaGrid, the largest grid computing project in China, and the chief scientists of National 973 Basic Research Program Project of Virtualization Technology of Computing System, and Cloud Security.Jin is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the ACM. He has co-authored 15 books and published over 600 research papers. His research interests include computer architecture, virtualization technology, cluster computing and cloud computing, peer-to-peer computing, network storage, and network security.

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Keynote Speaker 7: Dr. Sean He, Senior Member of IEEE
Professor at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Australia
Title: Detection of Denial-of-Service Attacks Based on Computer Vision Techniques

Abstract: Detection of Denial-of-Service (DoS) attacks has attracted researchers since 1990s. A variety of detection systems has been proposed to achieve this task. Unlike the existing approaches based on machine learning and statistical analysis, the proposed system treats traffic records as images and detection of DoS attacks as a computer vision problem. A multivariate correlation analysis approach is introduced to accurately depict network traffic records and to convert the records into the respective images. The images of network traffic records are used as the observed objects of our proposed DoS attack detection system, which is developed based on a widely used dissimilarity measure, namely Earth Mover's Distance (EMD). EMD takes cross-bin matching into account and provides a more accurate evaluation on the dissimilarity between distributions than some other well-known dissimilarity measures. These unique merits facilitate our proposed system with effective detection capabilities. To evaluate the proposed EMD-based detection system, ten-fold cross-validations are conducted using KDD Cup 99 data set and ISCX 2012 IDS Evaluation data set. The results presented in the system evaluation section illustrate that our detection system can detect unknown DoS attacks and achieves 99.95% detection accuracy on KDD Cup 99 data set and 90.12% detection accuracy on ISCX 2012 IDS evaluation data set with processing capability of approximately 59,000 traffic records per second.

Professor Xiangjian(Sean) He, as a Chief Investigator has received various research grants including four national Research Grants awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC).He is the Director of Computer Vision and Recognition Laboratory at the Global Big Data Technologies Centre (GBDTC) and a leader of Network Security research team at the Centre for Research Information Networks (CRIN) at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS).
He is an IEEE Senior Member and an IEEE Signal Processing Society Student Committee member. He has been awarded 'Internationally Registered Technology Specialist' by International Technology Institute (ITI). He has been carrying out research mainly in the areas of image processing, network security, pattern recognition and computer vision in the last two decades. He has played various chair roles in many international conferences such as ACM MM, MMM, IEEE CIT, IEEE AVSS, TrustCom, ICARCV etc..
In recent years, he has many high quality publications in IEEE Transactions journals such as IEEE Transactions on Computers, IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on Reliability, IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics, and in Elsevier's journals such as pattern Recognition, Signal Processing, Neurocomputing, Future Generation Computer Systems, Computer Networks, Computer and System Sciences, Network and Computer Applications. He has also had papers published in premier international conferences and workshops such as CVPR, ECCV, ACM MM, TrustCom and WACV. He has published more than 300 research papers. His papers have been cited for more than 1000 times since 2010.
He has recently been a guest editor for various international journals such as Journal of Computer Networks and Computer Applications (Elsevier) and Signal Processing (Elsevier). He has also been in the editorial boards of various international journals.
Since 1985, he has been an academic, a visiting professor, an adjunct professor, a postdoctoral researcher or a senior researcher in various universities/institutions including Xiamen University, China, University of New England, Australia, University of Georgia, USA, Electronic and Telecommunication Research Institute (ETRI) of Korea, University of Aizu, Japan, Hongkong Polytechnic University, and Macau University.

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